Caldecott Medal Award

Caldecott Medal Award!

The Caldecott Medal was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.  

2016 Medal Winner

Book Cover: Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World's Most Famous BearFinding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear, illustrated by  Sophie Blackall, written by Lindsay Mattick 
 
Finding Winnie is an incredible account of the friendship and love shared between a soldier and the real bear who inspired Winnie-the-Pooh. Blackall beautifully interprets this multi-dimensional family story through her distinctive Chinese ink and watercolor art, capturing intimate and historical details perfect for a child’s eye. 
 



2016 Honor Books

Book Cover: Trombone ShortyTrombone Shorty, pictures by Bryan Collier and words by Troy Andrews 
 
In this autobiography, Trombone Shorty reminisces about his early life in the jazz music scene of his beloved hometown of New Orleans. Through Collier’s paintings and collage illustrations, the story’s authentic, heartfelt tone is masterfully realized. 

 
Book Cover: WaitingWaiting, illustrated and written by Kevin Henkes
 
Waiting delivers an intimate story of five figurines, each anticipating the wonder of everyday moments. Using rich brown lines and a soft pastel palette, Henkes invites young readers to slow down and explore a range of emotions in a world on a windowsill. 

 
Book Cover: Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou HamerVoice of Freedom:  Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, illustrated by Ekua Holmes, written by Carole Boston Weatherford 
 
In this biography in verse, Ekua Holmes’ illustrations provide children with an intensely visual encounter with Civil Rights icon Fannie Lou Hamer. The repetition of colors and motifs within the richly layered collage create complex images that capture Hamer’s power and bravery.

 
Book Cover: Last Stop on Market StreetLast Stop on Market Street, illustrated by Christian Robinson and written by Matt de la Peña,
 

Readers are transported, along with a young boy and his grandmother, on a journey through the city. Robinson’s illustrations, a colorful mix of acrylic paint and collage, feel both vintage and fresh. The diversity, vibrancy, and beauty of the urban setting are celebrated as CJ and Nana share meaningful moments together.

 



The 2015 Winner is . . .

 

 Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat

Beekle, an imaginary friend, undergoes an emotional journey looking for his human. Santat uses fine details, kaleidoscopic saturated colors, and exquisite curved and angular lines to masterfully convey the emotional essence of this special childhood relationship. 

The 2015 Honor Books are. . .

 

Nana and the City by Lauren Castillo

Nana and the City tells the story of a young boy’s visit to his grandmother, and the reassuring way she helps him to lose his fear and experience the busy, loud city in a new way. 

 

 

The Noisy Paint Box: The Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky's Abstract Art, illustrated by Mary GrandPré, written by Barb Rosenstock 

Abstract artist Vasily Kandinsky experienced colors as sounds and sounds as colors; he created work that was bold and groundbreaking using colors from his "noisy paint box.” His process is reflected beautifully by GrandPré, whose paint flows across the page in ethereal ribbons of color.

 

 

Sam & Dave Dig a Hole, illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett 

Klassen’s use of texture, shape and earth tones in this deceptively simple book invite readers into the experience of two boys, who, accompanied by their dog, set out to dig a hole. Readers will find an unexpected treasure and be challenged to ponder the meaning of “spectacular.” 

 

 

The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus, illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant 

Sweet’s inspired mixed media illustrations illuminate the personality and work of a man passionately interested in many things. Her collages combine disparate elements to create a cohesive whole, echoing the ways in which Roget ordered the world into lists that evolved into his groundbreaking thesaurus. 

 

 

Viva Frida, illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales

Using a unique variety of media - puppetry, printmaking, painting and photography - combined with an intoxicating use of color and unfailing sense of composition, Morales celebrates the artistic process. 

 

 The 2014 Winner is . . . 

Locomotive, illustrated by Brian Floca

All aboard! Accompany a family on an unforgettable weeklong train trip from Omaha to Sacramento in 1869. Brian Floca’s dramatic watercolor, ink, acrylic and gouache illustrations incorporate meticulously-researched portraits of the train, the travelers and the crew as they traverse the American landscape on the new transcontinental railroad.

 

The 2014 Honor books are . . .

 

 

Journey, written and illustrated by Aaron Becker 

Finding a magical red crayon, a bored and lonely girl draws a new door on her bedroom wall that leads her to a wondrous but perilous new world. Her drab, sepia-toned, humdrum reality gives way to sumptuous, lushly-hued watercolor and pen and ink landscapes.

 

 

Mr. Wuffles! written and illustrated by David Wiesner 

Mr. Wuffles finds a new toy that is actually a tiny spaceship in this nearly wordless science fiction tale of epic and miniature proportions. Crisp watercolor and India ink illustrations shine in an innovative graphic novel, picture book hybrid featuring hidden worlds, alien languages and one peeved cat.

 

 

Flora and the Flamingo, written and illustrated by Molly Idle 

The budding relationship between an awkward young girl and a graceful flamingo is revealed through carefully orchestrated flaps. The minimalist setting, limited color palette, use of white space and page turns create a timeless and joyful visual experience.  The call-and-response of this balletic duet is cinematic and comedic.

The 2013 Winner is...

This Is Not My Hat

by: Jon Klassen

When a tiny fish shoots into view wearing a round blue topper (which happens to fit him perfectly), trouble could be following close behind. So it’s a good thing that enormous fish won’t wake up. And even if he does, it’s not like he’ll ever know what happened. . . . Visual humor swims to the ...

The 2013 Honor Books are...

Creepy Carrots

by: Aaron Reynolds

The Twilight Zone comes to the carrot patch as a rabbit fears his favorite treats are out to get him. Jasper Rabbit loves carrots—especially Crackenhopper Field carrots. He eats them on the way to school. He eats them going to Little League. He eats them walking...

 

 

Extra Yarn

by: Jon Klassen

 Extra Yarn is the story of how a young girl and her box of magical yarn transform a community. 

 

Green

by: Laura Vaccaro

How many kinds of green are there? There's the lush green of a forest on a late spring day, the fresh, juicy green of a just-cut lime, the incandescent green of a firefly, and the vivid aquamarine of a tropical sea.

 

 

 One Cool Friend

by: Toni Buzzeo

On a spontaneous visit to the aquarium, straight-laced and proper Elliot discovers his dream pet: a penguin. When he asks his father if he may have one (please and thank you), his ... 

 

Sleep Like a Tiger

by: Mary Logue 

 “Does everything in the world go to sleep?” the little girl asks. In sincere and imaginative dialogue between a not-at-all sleepy child and understanding parents, the little girl decides “in a cocoon of sheets, a nest of blankets,” she is ready to sleep, warm and strong, just like a tiger.

 


 Source:  http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/caldecottmedal/caldecottmedal